Parents

In order to register as a merit badge counselor an applicant must fill out 2 forms.  First, a standard BSA adult application, both pages. Make sure you use code 42 for your Unit Position Code which is NOT listed on the form.  Second, a merit badge counselor form.  Both forms must be completely filled out and submitted to our This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..  All merit badge counselors must also complete Youth Protection Training through www.myscouting.org before they may be registered. 

Here are some links to get you started as a merit badge counselor:

 

Newest Merit Badges:

Mining in Society

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Cooking

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Sustainability

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Programming

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Cycling

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Game Design

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Search and Rescue

 

 

 

 

 

Kayaking

 

 

 

 

 

Welding

Boy Scouting is a boy-led, boy-run program, but the boys must be trained to be leaders. Adult role models in Scouting provide an ideal learning experience for all youth. Every adult volunteer has something valuable to offer. On a typical weekend campout, Scouts might work with an adult volunteer who teaches the Fishing merit badge and with a Scout mom to learn orienteering, go on a 5-mile hike with another adult leader, and end the day learning how to clean and cook fresh fish from someone else.

The advantages of Scouting are not limited to boys. Adults also develop leadership and physical skills with every training experience.

Volunteers learn, too. Volunteers spend a significant amount of time to ensure the success of Scouting in their communities. The average Scout volunteer gives 20 hours of service each month, and 96 percent of volunteers say they would recommend volunteering for the BSA to other adults. In fact, volunteers believe their time invested with the Boy Scouts of America helps them be:

  • A better citizen
  • A better parent
  • A better manager
  • A better employee
  • More patient and tolerant of others
  • More open to new ideas and opinions

We need you to provide the direction, coaching, and training that empowers today’s youth with the skills they will need to lead tomorrow.

Get involved today.

For more information on what volunteering can do for you, read the Volunteer Outcomes Study.

> Adult Registration

In a Cub Scout pack, Boy Scout troop, Varsity Scout team, Venturing crew, or Sea Scout ship—or in any position in a district or council—your participation is a service to your community and helps youth become better citizens.

As members of the Boy Scouts of America, high-quality adult leaders are important role models for youth. This application helps the chartered organization to select qualified leaders to serve as volunteers. 

If you would like to participate, help, assist or simply be part of the activities of the troop you must register as an adult and take the Youth Protection Training.

Download the Adult Registration Form Here

> Youth Protection Training (YPT)

The Boy Scouts of America places the greatest importance on creating the most secure environment possible for our youth members. To maintain such an environment, the BSA developed numerous procedural and leadership selection policies and provides parents and leaders with resources for the Cub Scout, Boy Scout, and Venturing programs.

You do not have to be a registered member or have a member ID to take Youth Protection training.

To take Youth Protection training go to MyScouting.org  and create an account.

From the MyScouting.org portal, click on E-Learning and take the Youth Protection training.

Upon completion, you may print a certificate of completion to submit with a volunteer application or submit the completion certificate to the unit leader for processing at the local council.

When your volunteer application is approved, you will receive a BSA membership card which includes your member ID number. After you receive your membership card, log back into MyScouting, click on My Profile and update the system by inputting your member ID number. This will link your Youth Protection training records, and any other training, in MyScouting to your BSA membership.

> Medical Information

In order to provide better care for its members and to assist them in better understanding their own physical capabilities, the Boy Scouts of America recommends that everyone who participates in a Scouting event have an annual medical evaluation by a certified and licensed health-care provider—a physician (MD or DO), nurse practitioner, or physician assistant. Providing your medical information on this four-part form will help ensure you meet the minimum standards for participation in various activities. For more information click the link below:

Health and Medical Records

> Volunteer Opportunities

Scouting volunteers come to Scouting from a variety of backgrounds and experiences. Plumbers, lawyers, housewives, teachers, doctors, janitors, and scientists—people from just about every occupation imaginable—are involved in leading youth to become responsible, caring, and competent citizens. They also quickly discover that Scout volunteering enables them to learn new skills and build lifelong friendships while having fun. Here are some of the ways you can help with our troop:

Policy on Use of the Annual Health and Medical Record

In order to provide better care for its members and to assist them in better understanding their own physical capabilities, the Boy Scouts of America recommends that everyone who participates in a Scouting event have an annual medical evaluation by a certified and licensed health-care provider—a physician (MD or DO), nurse practitioner, or physician assistant. Providing your medical information on this site list all forms and will help ensure you meet the minimum standards for participation in various activities. Note that unit leaders must always protect the privacy of unit participants by protecting their medical information.

Note: This record is provided as a fillable PDF, and members are encouraged to fill it out on their computer, then print the record (rather than printing the record and filling it out by hand). Doing this will improve the readability and accuracy of each member's medical information. 

Parts A and B  are to be completed at least annually by participants in all Scouting events. This health history, parental/guardian informed consent and release agreement, and talent release statement are to be completed by the participant and parents/guardians.

Part C  is the physical exam that is required for participants in any event that exceeds 72 consecutive hours, for all high-adventure base participants, or when the nature of the activity is strenuous and demanding. Service projects or work weekends may fit this description. Part C is to be completed and signed by a certified and licensed heath-care provider—physician (MD or DO), nurse practitioner, or physician assistant. It is important to note that the height/weight limits must be strictly adhered to when the event will take the unit more than 30 minutes away from an emergency vehicle, accessible roadway, or when the program requires it, such as backpacking trips, high-adventure activities, and conservation projects in remote areas. 

The Experience of University of Scouting

November 3, 2012 Ed Koeneman, Michael Callahan and I all packed up in the car and made the scenic drive to the Heard where the University of Scouting was. My schedule through the day was The Eagle Process, Webelos to Scout Transition, Adult Awards, Getting Parents Involved, and Dealing with a Difficult Scout. 

In the first class, The Eagle Process we where introduced to the Eagle Scout Application process and how the electronic process works. The abundance of information the facilitators shared with us was overwhelming. But as I walked away I had a better understanding of the steps the young men of the troop will be taking though their final steps of scouting. The steps, as leaders, have been taking to prepare the boys for since they where tigers. The power point page that resonated in my mind the most was: 

            Fight the curse

Read the instructions first

Then read the entire workbook to avoid the worst

In the class, Webelos to Scout Transition (my little interpretation -aka- How to Get Parents to Understand hands in the Pockets and Duck Tape Over the Mouth) was a small class of 4 leaders. The discussion reminded us of the purpose of scouting to build Character, Citizenship and Physical Well-being. Being a small class the discourse was upfront and personal, reminded me that all troops in BSA have the same goal to guide the young boys into the world of being a young man and how as parents our role too have to make the transition. 

The paradox of having parents step away from the boys as a scout and yet still be involved with the Scouts was discussed the class Getting Parents Involved. The Kinks song “Should I stay or go now. If I stay there will be trouble if I go it will be doubled…please please let me knowwwww, should I stay or go now…” rings in my head. I feel a tug at my heart in this class. There are the few parents that seem to be endlessly involved with the Scouts and the parents that drop off the boy and run. So it may seem. A formula to be calculated, the solution, give every parent a small job. Be up front. Ask. Explain how they are helping and always say thank you. 

I wanted to share my experience, as the training coordinator of Troop 451, as a parent and a role model to the troop.  At the University of Scouting. I learned that training is beneficial. I was introduced to many people who have the same goal as me, to develop the most awesome experience for our boys and even have some fun as a parent.

 

 

 

 

 

What I learned at University of Scouting

November 3, 2012 Ed Koeneman, Michael Callahan and I all packed up in a car and made the scenic drive to the Heard where the University of Scouting was. My schedule through the day was The Eagle Process, Webelos to Scout Transition, Adult Awards, Getting Parents Involved, and Dealing with a Difficult Scout.

In the first class, The Eagle Process we where introduced to the Eagle Scout Application process and how the electronic process works. The abundance of information the facilitators shared with us was overwhelming. But as I walked away I had a better understanding of the steps the young men of the troop will be taking tough their final steps of scouting. The steps, as leaders, have been taking to prepare the boys for since they where tigers. The power point page that resonated in my mind the most was:

            Fight the curse

Read the instructions first

Then read the entire workbook to avoid the worst  

In the class, Webelos to Scout Transition (my little interpretation -aka- How to Get Parents to Understand hands in the Pockets and Duck Tape Over the Mouth) was a small class of 4 leaders. The discussion reminded us of the purpose of scouting to build Character, Citizenship and Physical Well-being. Being a small class the discourse was upfront and personal, reminded me that all troops in BSA have the same goal to guide the young boys into the world of being a young man and how as parents our role too have to make the transition. 

The paradox of having parents step away from the boys as a scout and yet still be involved with the Scouts was discussed the class Getting Parents Involved. The Kinks song “Should I stay or go now. If I stay there will be trouble if I go it will be doubled…please please let me knowwwww, should I stay or go now…” rings in my head. I feel a tug at my heart in this class. There are the few parents that seem to be endlessly involved with the Scouts and the parents that drop off the boy and run. So it may seem. A formula to be calculated, the solution, give every parent a small job. Be up front. Ask. Explain how they are helping and always say thank you.

I wanted to share my experience, as the training coordinator of Troop 451, as a parent and a role model to the troop.  At the University of Scouting. I learned that training is beneficial. I was introduced to many people who have the same goal as me, to develop the most awesome experience for our boys and even have some fun as a parent.

To all parents,

Please come to the parent meeting for all the upcoming event information and discuss troop subjects. Water Weekend is coming up and

 

Youth Protection Training Is a Requirement for all Adult Volunteers

Youth Protection training is designed to help you keep our youth safe from abuse. Click the link below and logon to the Boy Scouts of America website and take this course.The estimated time to complete: 40 minutes.

The troop makes use of many forms of media services and to promote and disemitate information to our members and the general public. Here are some of the services we use and a little explanation of how we make use of them.

 

dropboxDropbox is a free service that lets you bring all your photos, docs, and videos anywhere. This means that any file you save to your Dropbox will automatically save to all your computers, phones and even the Dropbox website.

Dropbox also makes it super easy to share with others, including scouts, scoutmasters, webmasters, and other leaders.

If you alrady have a dropbox account you can request a shared folder for the Troop 451 so you can collaborate with us.

 

flickr

Flickr is the best way to store, sort, search and share your photos online. Flickr helps you organize that huge mass of photos you have and offers a way for you and your friends and family to tell stories about them.

We store all of our photos and videos in flickr for troop members to view and download. Once we collect most of the photos from any activity, we usually upload them to dropbox first for processing and selecting, then we post them on flickr and create the necessary links to our site. If you already have a flickr account you can just request access and join us directly.

 

YoutubeYouTube provides a forum for people to connect, inform, and inspire others across the globe and acts as a distribution platform for original content creators. Most of the movies created or edited by the scouts will be stored in the troop451 channel at youtube. If you have any videos you have taken of any events, please contact the webmasters so we can link them to our channel or upload them.

 

Facebook

Our facebook site is updated continously with information relevant to the troop. If your prefered method of communication is through facebook, please take a look at our pages and like us.

 

 

rssIf you have an RSS reader and would like to stay informed of our activities and announcements, simly link to our RSS feed and stay in touch.

 

 

newsletter logo

Our newsletter goes out every month and some times, depending on how busy we are every two weeks. Very important information about activities and announcements are cointained in the newsletter. If you are not receiving the newsletter, please sing up on the front of our webpage under: Newsletter Signup.

 

 EmailEmail is an essential part of our communication strategy. If you don't have an email account or are not receiving email messages from us, please let the webmasters know as soon as possible. Also make sure to allow any emails from anybody @troop451.com, since the email we send out usually come from different addresses that contain our domain and are clearly identified as the troop's email address. Click here for instructions on how to whitelist our email addresses.

GoogleCalendarLogoWe make use of Google Calendar for our activities and events. You can subscribe to our calendar or view our calendar by clicking on the following buttons  . This will guarantee you have all the information at your figertips.

Subcategories

A cornerstone of the Boy Scout programs is training. There are many opportunities available to youth at various levels to further develop. Some of these trainings will be conducted in your unit; others are available for you to work on by yourself.